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Cute alert: Toronto Zoo releases new photos of baby cubs

The Canadian Press | posted Monday, Oct 19th, 2015

pandababy-featured

The Toronto Zoo has released new photos of its baby pandas and they are exactly as adorable as they sound.

A baby panda is seen at The Toronto Zoo on Oct. 17, 2015. TORONTO ZOO.
A baby panda is seen at The Toronto Zoo on Oct. 17, 2015. TORONTO ZOO.
This little baby panda can't even handle how cute it is. TORONTO ZOO.
This little baby panda can’t even handle how cute it is. TORONTO ZOO.

The six-day-old panda cubs are covered in fur but still appear quite pink, with nearly translucent tails.

They are “becoming quite vocal, active and bright,” the zoo said in a statement.

“Their white fur appears to be fuzzier and hints of black pigment can now be noticed on their skin over their ears, around their eyes and even over their shoulders. While their eyes are still closed, they are wiggling and demonstrating all of the right behaviours looking for nourishment from mom.”

Er Shun tends to one of her cubs at The Toronto Zoo on Oct. 16, 2015. TORONTO ZOO.
Er Shun tends to one of her cubs at The Toronto Zoo on Oct. 16, 2015. TORONTO ZOO.

The Zoo said Er Shun “continues to demonstrate strong maternal instincts, cradling, nursing and continuing to form a bond with both cubs.”

The pandas were born on Oct. 13 and it is still a critical time, the Zoo cautioned.

It may take several months to determine the cubs’ sex and they have not yet been named. There is no immediate plan to show them to the public, but the zoo has been updating its FacebookTwitter andInstagram feeds with photos of the cubs.

For now, they are living between their mother’s care and an incubator set up in a quarantined room next to the panda’s maternity ward, which is closed to the public.

Sperm from three different donors – Da Mao and two pandas in China – was used during the one-day fertility window back on May 14, and it’s unclear whether the cubs are twins.

If they survive, the cubs will live at the zoo for about two years and will likely return to China once they are weaned from Er Shun.

With files from The Canadian Press 

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