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TTC’s holiday schedule involves reduced service, free New Year’s Eve

News staff | posted Thursday, Dec 24th, 2015

The TTC will have reduced rides over the holidays but free service on New Year’s Eve.

As police across the GTA conduct holiday RIDE spotchecks, the TTC and sponsor Corby Spirit and Wine are hoping to encourage people to consume alcohol responsibly, and take safe transportation (instead of getting behind the wheel).

Free service will begin at 7p.m. on Dec. 31, 2015 and run until 7 a.m. on Jan. 1, 2016.

Before then, however, there will be a modified holiday schedule. Check out the details below or click here for the TTC website.

Dec. 21 – Dec. 24 (Monday to Thursday)

  • Weekday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 6 a.m.

Dec. 25 (Friday, Christmas Day)

  • Sunday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 9 a.m.

Dec. 26 (Saturday, Boxing Day)

  • Holiday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 6 a.m.

Dec. 27 (Sunday)

  • Sunday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 9 a.m.

Dec. 28 – Dec. 30 (Monday to Wednesday)

  • Weekday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 6 a.m.

Dec. 31 (Thursday, New Year’s Eve)

  • Travel free from 7 p.m. until 7 a.m., Jan. 1
  • Weekday service, with late evening service extended later than usual
  • Subway and most routes start at 6 a.m.
  • Free parking at TTC parking lots after 3 p.m.
  • Subway and most bus and streetcar service extended until approximately 4 a.m., Fri., Jan. 1
  • New Year’s Eve last subway times
    • Line 1: north from Union Station at 3:30 a.m.
    • Line 2: east or west from Bloor-Yonge Station at 3:37 a.m.
    • Line 3: east from Kennedy Station at 4:07 a.m.
    • Line 4: east from Sheppard-Yonge Station at 3:58 a.m.
    • The 300 Bloor-Danforth and the 320 Yonge bus routes begin service at 3 a.m. and will operate until 9 a.m. on New Year’s Day

Jan. 1 (Friday, New Year’s Day)

  • Sunday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 9 a.m.

Jan. 2 (Saturday)

  • Saturday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 6 a.m.

Jan. 3 (Sunday)

  • Sunday service
  • Subway and most routes start at 8 a.m., as subway service on Sundays now starts an hour earlier.

What’s open and closed Christmas and Boxing Day; some events too

CityNews | posted Thursday, Dec 24th, 2015

closedsign-featured

It’s crunch time, one and all. Last-minute shopping, gift wrapping, writing cards, baking sweets, cooking the family meal, and buying the much-needed wine are some of things on your to-do list for Christmas Day.

And when it’s all said and done, there’s Boxing Day to look forward to. Some shopping enthusiasts even head straight from the family gathering to line up at their favourite store to be the first to snag some good deals.

So, as you run around doing all these things, we have compiled a handy list of what’s open and closed on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

Presents under a Christmas tree. GETTY IMAGES/UIG.
Presents under a Christmas tree. GETTY IMAGES/UIG.

While Christmas Day festivities and Boxing Day shopping are at the top of mind, there are a couple of hockey events taking place this weekend, including the World Junior championship. And someone could get a magical Christmas present from the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG) this weekend.

If you are looking for something to do with your children over the holidays, check out the Magical Toyland at Casa Loma.

Merry Christmas, from everyone at 680 NEWS and CityNews!

Transit

TTC
Dec. 24: Regular weekday service
Dec. 25: Sunday service schedule (most routes start at 9 a.m.)
Dec. 26: Holiday service schedule (most routes start at 6 a.m.)

The TTC will have reduced rides over the holidays but free service on New Year’s Eve.

File photo of the 504 King streetcar.
File photo of the 504 King streetcar.

GO Transit
Dec. 24: Early homebound service (Check the GO website for schedule details)
Dec. 25: Sunday service schedule
Dec. 26: Saturday service schedule

Shopping

Bramalea City Centre
Dec. 24: 8 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 7 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Eaton Centre
Dec. 24: 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 7 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Dufferin Mall
Dec. 24: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 9 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Erin Mills Town Centre
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

People shopping at the Eaton Centre on the day before Christmas Eve in Toronto on Dec. 23, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS IMAGES/Rachel Verbin.
People shopping at the Eaton Centre on the day before Christmas Eve in Toronto on Dec. 23, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS IMAGES/Rachel Verbin.

Fairview Mall
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 8 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

Pacific Mall
Open 365 days a year

Scarborough Town Centre
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sherway Gardens
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 7 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Shops at Don Mills
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 9 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Square One
Dec. 24: 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

The Promenade
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 8 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Toronto Premium Outlets
Dec. 24: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 6 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Vaughan Mills
Dec. 24: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 7 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Yorkdale Mall
Dec. 24: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Grocery/drug stores

Sobeys
Dec. 24: Most stores will be open from 12 a.m. to 6 p.m. Click here to check the hours at your local store.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: Most stores are open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Loblaws
Dec. 24: Most stores will be open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Click here to check the hours at your local store.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Longo’s
Dec. 24: Most stores will be open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Click here to check the hours at your local store.
Dec. 24: Closed
Dec. 26: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Shoppers Drug Mart
Select stores will be open on Christmas Day, and store hours over the holidays vary by location. Click here to check the hours at your local store.

Note: Call your local grocery or drug store for their holiday hours before heading out.

LCBO/Beer Stores

LCBO
Dec. 24: All stores will open at regular hours and close at 6 p.m. Click here to check hours at your local LCBO.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: Closed. Some LCBO agency stores may choose to open on Boxing Day.

An LCBO store is pictured in Toronto April 20, 2010. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Francis Vachon.
An LCBO store is pictured in Toronto April 20, 2010. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Francis Vachon.

The Beer Store
Dec. 24: All stores will open at regular hours and close at 6 p.m. Click here to check hours at your local store.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: Closed

Tourist attractions

Toronto Zoo
Dec. 24: 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

The Toronto Zoo's twin pandas are seen on Nov. 12, 2015. Screen grab via Twitter/@TheTorontoZoo.
The Toronto Zoo’s twin pandas are seen on Nov. 12, 2015. Screen grab via Twitter/@TheTorontoZoo.

Four rare white lion cubs hanging out in the maternity ward. Photo via Twitter/@TorontoZoo.
Four rare white lion cubs hanging out in the maternity ward. Photo via Twitter/@TorontoZoo.

Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada
Dec. 24: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 25: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Dec. 26:  9 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Royal Ontario Museum
Dec. 24: 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Casa Loma
Dec. 24: 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Ontario Science Centre
Dec. 24: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

AGO
Dec. 24: 10:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: 10:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Government offices

Dec. 24: Most banks and other government offices open until the early afternoon
Dec. 25: Closed (no mail delivery)
Dec. 26: Closed (no mail delivery)

Toronto Public Library

Dec. 24: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: Closed

Toronto garbage collection

Dec. 25: No collection (All collections pushed forward one day. Click here for more information.)

A blue bin and a black bin are seen in High Park on Oct. 14, 2015. Image courtesy CityNews viewer Astrida Liepins.
A blue bin and a black bin are seen in High Park on Oct. 14, 2015. Image courtesy CityNews viewer Astrida Liepins.

City of Toronto recreation centres

Dec. 24: Community recreation centres will close at 4 p.m., except those with scheduled permits.
Dec. 25: Closed
Dec. 26: Closed

Click here for list of activities to do in the city over the holidays.

Events

Christmas Day jackpot 
Now this would be the ultimate Christmas present! The OLG says the Dec. 25 Lotto Max jackpot is $60 million with 35 additional $1 million prizes.

Janine Lubey, centre, promotes the Lotto-Max lottery at Yonge and Dundas Square in Toronto on Sept. 25, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marta Iwanek.
Janine Lubey, centre, promotes the Lotto-Max lottery at Yonge and Dundas Square in Toronto on Sept. 25, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marta Iwanek.

Hockey galore
A Boxing Day tradition starts on Saturday. Canada’s World Junior Hockey team starts its defence of its 2015 title in Helsinki, Finland.

Canadian players celebrate Canada's 5-4 win over Russia during the gold medal game hockey action at the IIHF World Junior Championship in Toronto on Jan. 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Canadian players celebrate Canada’s 5-4 win over Russia during the gold medal game hockey action at the IIHF World Junior Championship in Toronto on Jan. 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

The Toronto Marlies play the annual Boxing Day classic at Ricoh Coliseum against the St. John’s Icecaps. Game time is at 3 p.m. and tickets are available here.

The Toronto Maple Leafs are back in action on Sunday. They’ll be in Brooklyn to face the New York Islanders.

Rogers Hometown Hockey in Oshawa
Rogers Hometown Hockey comes to the GTA this weekend. The festivities take over the area around Oshawa City Hall starting at noon Boxing Day and continue the next day, leading up to the televised Leafs game.

Magical Toyland at Casa Loma
If you’re looking for something to do post-Christmas with the children, Casa Loma is keeping the holiday magic alive.

It’s called Magical Toyland and features magic shows and Santa hosting children in his workshop and leading them in a scavenger hunt and other arts and crafts. Click here for ticket information.

White Christmas at Toronto Zoo: Polar bear cub captures our hearts

CityNews | posted Thursday, Dec 24th, 2015

torontozoo-polarbear-878x494

Toronto Zoo’s baby polar bear cub is growing up so fast.

She’s now six weeks old and weighs 2.1 kilograms. Her eyes are fully open and so are her ears. And she is teething – poor thing.

But the teething hasn’t curbed her hearty appetite. She eats seven times a day, and like any child, she wants some play time after each feed.

Watch the video here or below and you can hear the “trilling sound of a very content bear,” the zoo said.

The zoo said this is still a critical time for the bear, who requires care 24 hours a day.

Two cubs were born on Nov. 11, but one of the cubs passed away within the first 24 hours.

Pandamonium: Toronto Zoo panda cubs dazzling us with their eyes

News staff | posted Wednesday, Dec 23rd, 2015

giantpandasdec23-878x494

The two giant panda cubs born at the Toronto Zoo in the fall were at first a pale pink with a covering of white fuzz.

Then, last month, new photos showed they got their mom’s distinct black-and-white markings. More photos released earlier this month showed their eyes starting to open and their voices becoming stronger.

And, as can be seen in a video below, released by the Zoo on Wednesday morning, one of the giant panda cubs is stretching their legs in the air.

And on Wednesday, the zoo released a new video of one of its giant panda cubs, who are now 10 weeks old, saying their eyes are fully open and they’re becoming more mobile.

One cub weighs over three kilograms, while the other is 2.5 kilograms.

new video shows one of the cubs nursing from mom Er Shun.

The zoo said while the cubs look very healthy, it’s still a critical time for them.

The two giant panda cubs were a Canadian first. The Zoo’s female giant panda gave birth to her first cub at 3:31 a.m. on Oct. 13. The newborn weighed 187.7 grams. The second cub was born at 3:44 a.m., weighing 115 grams.

Er Shun has shown superb maternal instincts with both of her cubs, the zoo said in a release.

“She has been exceptionally co-operative with twin-swapping the cubs and nurses them both several times a day. The strong bond she has formed with each of the cubs is remarkable.”

Attention, shoppers: Ready to brave biggest shopping day of the year?

Jackie Rosen and news staff | posted Wednesday, Dec 23rd, 2015

eatoncentre-christmasshopping-878x494

If you plan to head out for some last-minute shopping on Wednesday, you’re likely to brave the biggest crowds you’ve seen all year.

Today is expected to be the busiest day of the year at stores across Canada.

Statistics from Interac show that Dec. 23 – not Christmas Eve – was Canada’s busiest shopping day in 2014.

So where are Canadians most likely to spend their money? More than a third of their money will be spent stocking up on food items for our big dinners, or simply because most grocery stores will be closed on Friday and Saturday.

Canadians’ second favourite destination on Dec. 23 are discount stores, followed by purchases of liquor, beer and wine.

Meanwhile, according to Moneris reports Canadian spending over the first two weeks of this month was 4.5 per cent than the comparable period last year, and spending on international credit cards is up.

Spending in Ontario was up close to eight per cent over last year.

Canadians are also 138 per cent more likely to be using tap to pay services.

And a note to last-minute shoppers: Keep in mind that not all stores will extend their hours during crunch time, so it’s best to check the facts online before you head out.

Click here for a list of what’s open and closed on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

Turkey 911! Top 10 tips for a juicy holiday bird

Michelle Lucas Larving | posted Tuesday, Dec 22nd, 2015

turkey-featured

A large, plump, roasted turkey is an incredible treat that can either make or break a festive dinner. The pressure is on, your family and friends are gathered and you want to create a memorable meal to be remembered through the ages. So how do you achieve holiday success? Follow these ten easy steps on how to get this beloved bird perfect every time.

1. Buy a better turkey
Fresh is always best, and quality does matter. With the growing number of amazing local turkey farmers there are more free-range and organic options to choose from. A happy bird will always make for a happy meal.

2. To brine or not to brine
Although buying a great turkey means you can skip this step, brining gives you a great safety net to ensure tender and juicy meat. Stir 28 cups of hot water with 1 ½ cups salt and ½ cup sugar in an extra large pot until dissolved. Throw in any herbs or spices (such as rosemary sprigs, whole peppercorns or crushed garlic cloves) and let cool to room temperature. Add your 18-20 lb turkey and soak overnight in the fridge.

3. Bring it to room temperature
It’s so important to allow your turkey to come up to room temperature before cooking. This will allow for the heat to be evenly distributed and provide an accurate cooking time.

4. Pat it dry
Use a clean dishtowel and pat the whole turkey down. It will help the skin crisp and take on a gorgeous amber colour. Once it’s dry, give it a little love with a generous brush of melted butter or good-quality olive oil.

5. Seasoning is key
Whether you’re stuffing your bird or not, always season both the cavity and skin well. You can’t undo a bland turkey.


Related: 5 reasons not to stuff your bird this year


6. Give it some space
I always cook turkey directly on the oven rack set over a simmering pan of stock and although it makes for a bit more mess (and some epic gravy) it’s totally worth it to have a perfectly cooked top and bottom. If you want to go a tidier route, set your turkey on any kind of rack inside your roasting pan.

7. Baste, Baste, Baste
You can’t over-baste. Seriously. Every 30 minutes to an hour makes for some delicious results. And while you’re at it, bonus points for brushing some more melted butter on there!

8. Slow and steady wins the race
Proper cook time is the most important factor and a turkey can’t be rushed! A hotter oven won’t speed up the process, it will just dry out your bird. So accept that you’re in it for the long haul and keep your oven to 325F. A 13-15 lb, unstuffed bird, should take about 3 1/4 to 3 1/5 hours.

9. Use a thermometer
You don’t want to under- or overcook your turkey, so always insert a thermometer into the thickest part of the thigh and breast. You’re looking for it to read 165F.

10. Take a break
Last but not least, it’s always tempting to want to carve the turkey straight from the oven—but it really needs a minimum of 20 minutes to rest at room temperature to reabsorb its juices. Bonus: this gives you extra time to get all your delicious side dishes set on the table, and powder your nose.

Related:
10 best turkey recipes
6 holiday stuffing recipes
4 essential tools for roasting turkey

Things to do with the kids over the holidays

Today's Parent | posted Tuesday, Dec 22nd, 2015

hockeykids-featured

Sasha Emmons from Today’s Parent shares her top things to do with the kids over the holidays.

Planet ROM for the Holidays

https://www.rom.on.ca/en/whats-on/rom-for-the-holidays

  • Check out a Mars Rover prototype
  • Touch a meteorite
  • Place space-inspired video games
  • Space gloves on loan from Chris Hadfield
  • Dec. 26 to Jan. 3
  • Adults $17, Kids 4-14 $14, Kids under 3 free

Children’s Discovery Centre

http://www.childrensdiscoverycentre.com

  • Great for little kids with camping, grocery market, a “boom room,” an art hive plus 6 other discovery centers
  • All based on imaginative and creative play
  • General admission for adults and kids over 1 $13; infants free

Magical Toyland at Casa Loma

http://www.casaloma.ca/casafeature7.html

  • Meet Olaf and Sven!
  • Breakdance shows
  • Santa
  • Cookie Decorating
  • Carollers
  • Scavenger hunt
  • Through Dec. 30
  • Adult $27, Kids $17 

Legoland Holiday Bricktacular

https://www.legolanddiscoverycentre.ca/toronto/news-events/event/9099/holiday-bricktacular.aspx

  • Holiday Hunt
  • Ornament build and special holiday Lego structures and building
  • Saturdays and Sundays until Dec. 27
  • General admission $17.50 if you buy online; kids under 3 free

OUTDOOR EVENTS

Evergreen Winter Village

http://www.evergreen.ca/wintervillage/

  • Local maker market and live music
  • Learn about winter trees in the children’s garden Dec. 26 and 27 (free)
  • DJ skating Dec. 23 and 26, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Blue Mountain or Horseshoe Valley Resort

  • Places like Blue Mountain and Horseshoe Resort have re-opened their Fall activities
  • Blue had their mini putt, ropes course, mountain coaster
  • Horseshoe has the mini putt, maze, and climbing wall
  • Fingers crossed for colder temps so they can start making more snow

Ice skating the Harbourfront Center

http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/venues/natrelrink/

  • Free skating right on the water
  • DJ skating on NYE and Jan. 2, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Which healthy food alternatives are best for you?

BT Toronto | posted Monday, Dec 21st, 2015

bryce-vid

Alternative health expert Bryce Wylde breaks down for us the healthy, healthier, and healthiest options for sweeteners, vitamins, and more.

Sweet Surprise:  Take Xylitol not Stevia

Customizing morning coffee has become a daily habit for even the most health conscious consumer. But, while most people know that adding sugar is the least healthy choice they can make – Bryce reveals there may be an even better choice among alternative sweeteners.

Stevia:

  • Contains steviosides, which may irritate the stomach.
  • Taking it too long may actually stress the liver.
  • Research suggests mixing Stevia with diabetes medication can cause a drop in blood sugar.
  • Similarly, research suggests Stevia may cause a drop in blood pressure for people taking blood pressure medication.

Xylitol:

  • A naturally occurring alcohol extracted from birch wood with a very low glycemic index.
  • Doesn’t spike blood sugar or insulin.
  • Tastes sweet, and unlike sugar, is not converted in the mouth to acids that cause tooth decay.
  • Works to starve the bad bacteria in the mouth.
  • Doesn’t have any known drug interactions.

Supplement Sibling Rivalry: Take Tocotrienols not Vitamin E

With so many vitamins to choose from, a consumer practically needs a GPS to navigate the supplements aisle in the health food store. Even more daunting are different options of the same vitamin! Bryce guides BT viewers to the best form of Vitamin E between rival “sister” choices.

Tocotrienols and Tocopherols belong to the Vitamin E family. Together, they are one of the most important phytonutrients in edible oils. But, studies show that one of them is more potent and better absorbed than the other.

Vitamin E is a powerful, fat-soluble antioxidant with a positive effect on immune health. In addition to helping protect cell membranes against damage caused by free radicals – it also protects against the oxidative damage that can lead to heart disease, has preventative effects against cancer, and helps relieve the symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

As the “parent”, Vitamin E consists of eight naturally occurring forms, a family of Tocopherols (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) and four Tocotrienols (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta). Studies not only lean to Tocotrienols for better potency and absorbancy – the Tocotrienol form of Vitamin E has also been found to promote new artery formation after a stroke, lower homocysteine levels, improve insulin sensitivity, protect vital brain circuitry, and even prevent bone loss.

Power Activated – Take Curcumin not Turmeric

The rich, exotic tastes of India have reached far beyond its borders – bringing not only delicious food – but also significant health benefits. Bryce explains how the Turmeric spice’s double duty as a food enhancer and alternative healing ingredient is being usurped by one of its own active ingredients.

Curcumin has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is the most active constituent of Turmeric.

You would have to take far more of the whole turmeric powder to ever get the benefits of a small amount of curcumin.

Curcumin from turmeric works as a natural treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee, acts as a weak phytoestrogen which may lend it some anti-cancer effects, and it induces programmed death of colon cancer cells leading to clinical trials which are investigating the use of curcumin in the treatment of colon cancer.

Curcumin can also suppresses inflammation in the GI tract associated with inflammatory bowel disease – and researchers speculate its anti-inflammatory effects may also influence lower rates of Alzheimer’s disease.

Less Pain More Gain – Take NEM not Glucosamine

Moving is one of the best things we can do for our health – but when movement is hindered by pain it’s a double health hazard. Our capacity for exercise reduces just as stress increases. Bryce hits the gym armed with the latest research on the relief of joint pain and stiffness.

The Glucosamine/Chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial analysis performed by the NIH to test the effects of the dietary supplements glucosamine hydrochloride (glucosamine) and sodium chondroitin sulfate (chondroitin sulfate) for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis revealed that glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate together or alone did not provide statistically significant pain relief.

5 well conducted rigorous human clinical trials were performed using only 500 mg NEM (one capsule) once daily which resulted in significantly reduced joint pain and stiffness in less than 10 days.

NEM is Natural Egg Membrane and it comes from an egg. It’s a natural food source that that contains naturally occurring glycosaminoglycans and proteins essential (the same stuff found in your cartilage) for maintaining healthy joints and connective tissues in a small daily dose.

A key thing to note when comparing NEM to other common joint health formulas is the small dose and quick results. Glucosamine and chondroitin generally requires 3 or 4 pills a day and do not deliver any relief for two to three months.

Go for Gold:  Take Golden Flax not Brown Flax

Recipes utilizing flax seeds are proliferating daily from breakfast smoothies to pizza dough. Bryce steps into the kitchen to compare Golden Flax to Brown Flax thus saving the viewer time – and taste buds.

Both Golden Flax and Brown Flax deliver about the same amount of alpha-linolenic acid. There’s no big difference in the essential fatty acid contents of either.

Both are quite nutritious and are best consumed ground.

Golden Flax is more completely digested as the hull of the Brown Flaxseed is harder.

Ultimately, Golden Flax tastes better – and that will likely lead to its continued use more frequently – thus stimulating a healthy routine.

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