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Police officers to fan out across eight busy Toronto intersections

CityNews | posted Monday, Jun 6th, 2016

traffic-congestion

Starting next Monday, drivers, pedestrians and cyclists will notice extra police officers at eight busy intersections in the city.

They will be working as “traffic assistant personnel,” or TAP, to help improve traffic flow and the safety of pedestrians and cyclists.

Monday’s announcement, which took place at Yonge Street and Sheppard Avenue – one of eight “congestion hotspots” – detailed plans to use “smart” traffic signals and police personnel to help direct traffic flow.

The pilot project is the latest in Mayor John Tory’s plan to cut down on gridlock across the city. Last year, in phase one, Tory introduced zero-tolerance for illegal parking during rush hour.

Earlier this year, Tory announced phase two of his congestion management plan, which includes implementing new technology for stoplights at 10 “hot-spot” intersections across the city. At the time, Tory said he was considering having people direct traffic.


Related stories:

Tory announces ‘smart’ stoplights at key intersections to help tackle gridlock

T.O. drivers rejoice: Road congestion in the city is improving

Vehicle towings doubled last year, thanks to Mayor Tory


Police officers will be deployed during peak periods at the following intersections:

  • Bay Street and Queen Street
  • Front Street and Simcoe Street
  • Lake Shore Boulevard and Parklawn Road
  • Sheppard Avenue and Yonge Street
  • Front Street and University Avenue
  • Bay Street and Bloor Street
  • University Avenue and Adelaide Street
  • Bay Street from Bloor Street to Front Street

“The goal is to improve the traffic flow and to improve the safety of pedestrians in these intersections,” Tory said at the press conference.

“The police officers will direct traffic, making sure that vehicles don’t block intersections … to keep vehicles moving and keep pedestrians and cyclists safe.”

The pilot project starts on June 13 and will take place during four weeks in the summer and four weeks in the fall.

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