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‘Salad dressing’ spills out of transport truck after DVP roll over

BT Toronto | posted Wednesday, Jul 20th, 2016

A 52-year-old man from Brampton faces careless driving charges after a transport truck spilled its load of salad dressing on the DVP northbound ramp to Highway 401 west late Tuesday morning.

The driver, who has yet to be named, was taken to hospital as a precaution as crews worked for most of the day to clean up the mess.

“You can see the traffic that is coming southbound is very slow,” said OPP Sgt. Kerry Schmidt from the scene.

Schmidt said the trailer had food products, specifically salad dressing and mayonnaise inside of it.

“I am being told many hours, most of the afternoon until we get the vehicle upright,” Schmidt said.

Man dead after fight near St. Lawrence Market

CityNews | posted Tuesday, Jul 19th, 2016

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One man is dead after a fight near St. Lawrence Market on Monday night.

The fight began among a group of people in a parkette near Front and Market streets around 9:30 p.m., Toronto police say.

By the time emergency crews arrived, just after 10 p.m., one man was already unconscious. He had a significant head injury and no vital signs.

Police said the victim was struck multiple times even after he was on the ground.

He was rushed to hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The name and age of the victim are not yet known.

No charges have been laid.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police.

Melania Trump RNC address resembles Michelle Obama’s 2008 speech

Erica Werner and Scott Bauer, The Associated Press | posted Tuesday, Jul 19th, 2016

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One delegate said everyone fell in love with her. Another compared her to Jackie Kennedy.

Melania Trump’s star turn at the Republican National Convention Monday night captivated a GOP crowd that had rarely heard from her through months of her husband’s tumultuous 2016 White House campaign.

Her speech also drew attention after the discovery that two passages of her remarks matched nearly word-for-word the speech that First Lady Michelle Obama delivered in 2008 at the Democratic National Convention. The passages in question focused on lessons that Trump’s wife says she learned from her parents and the relevance of their lessons in her experience as a mother.

The passages came near the beginning of her roughly 10-minute speech. Mrs. Trump’s address was otherwise distinct from the address that Mrs. Obama gave when then-Sen. Barack Obama was being nominated for president.

In Mrs. Trump’s speech in Cleveland, she said: “From a young age, my parents impressed on me the values that you work hard for what you want in life, that your word is your bond and you do what you say and keep your promise, that you treat people with respect. They taught and showed me values and morals in their daily life.”

In Mrs. Obama’s 2008 speech in Denver, she said: “And Barack and I were raised with so many of the same values: like, you work hard for what you want in life, that your word is your bond, that you do what you say you’re going to do, that you treat people with dignity and respect, even if you don’t know them and even if you don’t agree with them.”

Another passage with notable similarities that follows two sentences later in Mrs. Trump’s speech addresses her attempts to instil those values in her son.

“We need to pass those lessons on to the many generations to follow,” Mrs. Trump said. “Because we want our children in this nation to know that the only limit to your achievements is the strength of your dreams and your willingness to work for them.”

In the first lady’s 2008 speech, she said, “Barack and I set out to build lives guided by these values and to pass them onto the next generation, because we want our children – and all children in this nation – to know that the only limit to the height of your achievements is the reach of your dreams and your willingness to work hard for them.”

Trump’s campaign responded in a statement that said her “immigrant experience and love for America shone through in her speech.” The statement didn’t mention Mrs. Obama.

“In writing her beautiful speech, Melania’s team of writers took notes on her life’s inspirations, and in some instances included fragments that reflected her own thinking,” Trump spokesman Jason Miller said.

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White House officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment late Monday evening.

In an interview with NBC News taped ahead of her convention appearance and posted online early Tuesday, Mrs. Trump said of her speech, “I wrote it.” She added that she had “a little help.”


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On the whole, Mrs. Trump presented a softer and gentler candidate. She said: “He is tough when he has to be, but he is also kind and fair and caring. This kindness is not always noted, but it is there for all to see. That is one reason I fell in love with him to begin with.”

The Slovenian-born former model, 24 years her husband’s junior, also reintroduced herself, showing poise as well as devotion to her adopted country and to her husband’s cause. Mrs. Trump, appearing in a striking white dress with elbow-length sleeves ending in big, puffy cuffs, spoke after an uncharacteristically brief introduction from her husband, who kissed her and called her “my wife, an amazing mother, an incredible woman.”

Prior to Monday, Mrs. Trump had spoken on her husband’s behalf only a few times, and briefly, and her remarks Monday lasted roughly 10 minutes as she spoke slowly in heavily accented English. But afterward delegates were gushing.

“I think she’s going to be a great asset. She’s just magnificent,” said John Salm, a delegate from Virginia. “Honestly she reminds me of Jackie Kennedy.”

“I think everybody fell in love with her tonight,” said Deedee Kelly, a delegate from Omaha, Nebraska. “She seemed to talk from her heart, she really did.”

The 46-year-old made clear her love for her husband, testifying to a softer side of the blustering real estate mogul the country knows. And without dwelling on her own humble upbringing in an industrial town in what was then a part of communist Yugoslavia, she spoke of her family, her sister Ines, her “elegant and hard-working mother Amalia,” and her father Viktor, who “instilled in me a passion for business and travel.”

“From a young age, my parents impressed on me the values that you work hard for what you want in life, that your word is your bond and you do what you say,” Mrs. Trump said, adding that she has passed those values to the couple’s 10-year-old son, Barron.

Mrs. Trump also gave a hint of what she might try to do as first lady.

“I will use that wonderful privilege to try to help people in our country who need it the most,” she said, describing helping children and women as “one of the many causes dear to my heart.”

Even as she largely avoided the spotlight prior to Monday, Mrs. Trump briefly became an issue in the race in March, when an anti-Trump super PAC released an ad with a risque photo of her from a GQ magazine photo shoot, showing her handcuffed to a briefcase, lying on a fur blanket.

“Meet Melania Trump. Your Next First Lady,” the ad said.

Trump responded by re-tweeting side-by-side images of Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s wife, with an unflattering grimace, and Mrs. Trump in a gauzy, glamorous pose.

If Trump were to be elected president, Mrs. Trump would be the only first lady who is the third wife of a president and the first to be born and raised in a communist nation. She wouldn’t be the first model – Pat Nixon and Betty Ford both modeled, too. And Louisa Adams, who was born in England, was the first president’s wife to be born in another country.

The glitter and glitz of being Donald Trump’s wife is a far cry from the sleepy southeastern industrial town of Sevnica, where she was born in 1970 as Melanija Knavs. Her father was a car dealer while her mother worked in a textile factory. The family lived in apartment blocks overlooking a river and smoking factory chimneys.

She found an escape through modeling when she was spotted in the Slovenian capital by a photographer. At age 16, she took modeling jobs in Milan and Paris. She changed her name to Melania Knauss and settled in New York in 1996. Two years later, she met her future husband at a party in Manhattan.

Scott Bauer reported from Madison, Wisconsin. Associated Press writer Jill Colvin contributed.

Wimbledon champ Andy Murray withdraws from Rogers Cup

Sportsnet | posted Tuesday, Jul 19th, 2016

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Andy Murray has withdrawn from the Rogers Cup, Tennis Canada announced on Monday.

The Wimbeldon champion has won the Rogers Cup three times in his career and this will be the first time since 2006 that he will not play in the tournament.

In a statement released on Monday, Murray said he’s pulling out of the Canadian ATP event due to a lack of rest between tournaments.

“My body needs some recovery time after reaching the latter stages of tournaments over the past few months. I’m sorry to my fans in Toronto but I look forward to being back in Canada next year.”

Premier Wynne advises Pokemon Go players to look up from their phones

The Canadian Press | posted Tuesday, Jul 19th, 2016

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Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne is advising Pokemon Go players to keep their eyes off their phones when walking, especially at intersections.

Wynne says she always advised her children to make eye contact with drivers when crossing the road, and points out you can’t do that if you’re looking down at your phone.

She says it’s really about common sense, and people understanding that they can put themselves at risk by focusing on their phone instead of their surroundings.

The province last week dismissed a request from the city of Toronto to amend the Highway Traffic Act to ban people from texting while walking on roads, saying the city could pass its own bylaw if it wanted to.

Wynne says she’s only interested in regulations and bylaws that are enforceable, suggesting she thinks it’s impossible to actually stop people from texting, emailing or playing games on their phones while walking.

Pokemon Go officially became available in Canada on Sunday, but many users had already figured out how to download the app, which superimposes animated characters onto a map-like interface using the video camera in smartphones.

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said Pokemon Go became available in Canada on Monday.

It’s here: Pokemon Go arrives in Canada

The Canadian Press | posted Monday, Jul 18th, 2016

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Pokemon Go is now finally available in Canada.

The augmented reality game became officially available on Sunday – previously Canadians had to find workarounds to play the game.

It was launched in the U.S., Australia, New Zealand and Japan earlier this month.

The game sends players into the real world to search for the mythical digital pocket monsters known as Pokemon.

They appear onscreen when users hold up their smartphones in various locations at various times of the day.

The Canadian rollout wasn’t without its glitches.

On Sunday afternoon, the app’s servers overloaded and players had to wait a little longer before they could register an account.


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Former Marine kills three Baton Rouge officers, wounds three others

Mike Kunzelman and Melinda Deslatte, The Associated Press | posted Monday, Jul 18th, 2016

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A former Marine dressed in black and carrying extra ammunition shot and killed three Baton Rouge law enforcement officers, less than two weeks after a black man was fatally shot by police there in a confrontation that sparked nightly protests that reverberated nationwide.

Three other officers were wounded Sunday, one critically. Police said the gunman was killed at the scene.

The shooting less than a mile from police headquarters added to the tensions across the country between the black community and police. Just days earlier, one of the slain officers had posted an emotional Facebook message about the challenges of police work in the current environment.

President Barack Obama urged Americans to tamp down inflammatory words and actions.

“We don’t need careless accusations thrown around to score political points or to advance an agenda. We need to temper our words and open our hearts … all of us,” Obama said.

The gunman was identified as Gavin Long of Kansas City, who turned 29 on Sunday.

Long, who was black, served in the Marines from 2005 to 2010, reaching the rank of sergeant. He deployed to Iraq from June 2008 to January 2009, according to military records.

Although he was believed to be the only person who fired at officers, authorities were investigating whether he had some kind of help.

“We are not ready to say he acted alone,” state police spokesman Major Doug Cain said. Two “persons of interest” were detained for questioning in the nearby town of Addis. They were later released without any charges being filed.

While in the military, Long was awarded several medals, including one for good conduct, and received an honourable discharge. His occupational expertise was listed as “data network specialist.”

The University of Alabama issued a statement saying Long attended classes for one semester in the spring of 2012. A school spokesman said university police had no interactions with him.

In Kansas City, police officers, some with guns drawn, converged on a house listed as Long’s.


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It was the fourth high-profile deadly encounter in the United States involving police over the past two weeks. In all, the violence has cost the lives of eight officers, including those in Baton Rouge, and two civilians and sparked a national debate over race and policing.

Authorities initially believed that additional assailants might be at large, but hours later said there were no other active shooters. They did not discuss the gunman’s motive or any relationship to the wider police conflicts.

The shooting began at a gas station on Airline Highway. According to radio traffic, Baton Rouge police answered a report of a man with an assault rifle and were met by gunfire. For several long minutes, they did not know where it was coming from.

The radio exchanges were made public Sunday by the website Broadcastify.

Nearly two-and-a-half minutes after the first report of an officer getting shot, an officer on the scene is heard saying police do not know the shooter’s location.

Almost six minutes pass after the first shots are reported before police say they have determined the shooter’s location. About 30 seconds later, someone says shots are still being fired.

The recording lasts about 17 minutes and includes urgent calls for an armoured personnel carrier called a BearCat.

“There simply is no place for more violence,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said. “It doesn’t further the conversation. It doesn’t address any injustice perceived or real. It is just an injustice in and of itself.”

Baton Rouge Police Department Officer Markell Morris holds a bouquet of flowers and a Superman action figure that a citizen left at the Our Lady of the Lake Hospital where the police officers were brought on July 17, 2016. Henrietta Wildsmith/The Times via AP.
Baton Rouge Police Department Officer Markell Morris holds a bouquet of flowers and a Superman action figure that a citizen left at the Our Lady of the Lake Hospital where the police officers were brought on July 17, 2016. Henrietta Wildsmith/The Times via AP.

From his window, Joshua Godwin said he saw the suspect, who was dressed in black with a ski mask, combat boots and extra bullets. He appeared to be running “from an altercation.”

Mike Spring awoke at a nearby house to a sound that he thought was from firecrackers. The noise went on for five to 10 minutes, getting louder.

Of the two officers who survived the shooting, one was hospitalized in critical condition, and the other was in fair condition. Another officer was being treated for non-life-threatening injuries, hospital officials said.

Two of the slain officers were from the Baton Rouge Police Department: 32-year-old Montrell Jackson, who had been on the force for a decade, and 41-year-old Matthew Gerald, who had been there for less than a year.

The third fatality was Brad Garafola, 45 and a 24-year veteran of the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office.

Jackson, who was black, posted his message on Facebook on July 8, just three days after the death of 37-year-old Alton Sterling, a black man killed by white Baton Rouge officers after a scuffle at a convenience store.

In the message, Jackson said he was physically and emotionally tired and complained that while in uniform, he gets nasty looks. When he’s out of uniform, he said, some people consider him a threat.

A friend of Jackson’s family, Erika Green, confirmed the posting, which is no longer on Facebook. A screenshot of the image was circulating widely on the internet.

Police-community relations in Baton Rouge have been especially tense since Sterling’s death. The killing was captured on cellphone video.

It was followed a day later by the shooting death of another black man in Minnesota, whose girlfriend livestreamed the aftermath of his death on Facebook. The next day, a black gunman in Dallas opened fire on police at a protest about the police shootings, killing five officers and heightening tensions even further.

Thousands of people protested Sterling’s death, and Baton Rouge police arrested more than 200 demonstrators.

Sterling’s nephew condemned the killing of the three Baton Rouge officers. Terrance Carter spoke Sunday to The Associated Press by telephone, saying the family just wants peace.

“My uncle wouldn’t want this,” Carter said. “He wasn’t this type of man.”

A few yards from a police roadblock on Airline Highway, Keimani Gardner was in the parking lot of a warehouse store that would ordinarily be bustling on a Sunday afternoon. He and his girlfriend both work there. But the store was closed because of the shooting.

“It’s crazy. … I understand some people feel like enough is enough with, you know, the black community being shot,” said Gardner, an African-American. “But honestly, you can’t solve violence with violence.”

Michelle Rogers and her husband drove near the shooting scene, but were blocked at an intersection closed by police.

“I can’t explain what brought us here,” she said. “We just said a prayer in the car for the families.”

Also Sunday, a domestic violence suspect opened fire on a Milwaukee police officer who was sitting in his squad car. The officer was seriously wounded, and the suspect fled and apparently killed himself, authorities said.

Associated Press writers Eric Tucker in Washington, Rebecca Santana and Janet McConnaughey in New Orleans, Maria Sudekum in Kansas City and Kevin McGill, Cain Burdeau and Gerald Herbert in Baton Rouge contributed to this report.

GOP convention kicks off as nation reels from more violence

Alan Fram and Steve Peoples, The Associated Press | posted Monday, Jul 18th, 2016

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The Republican National Convention is set to kick off as the nation reels from another deadly shooting and dissident delegates stage a longshot, last-gasp effort to deny Donald Trump the GOP nomination for president.

Amid the tumult, it was undeniably Trump’s moment – a week at the pinnacle of American politics that few could have imagined when the New York billionaire entered the race a year ago.

“We want America to understand who Donald Trump the man is, not just Donald Trump the candidate,” said campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

Yet the first act Monday was likely to underline how divisive Trump has been. Delegates were voting on the rules that will govern the convention week, and insurgent delegates said they would try to force a state-by-state vote – a move that could disrupt floor proceedings even if they fail.

Trump’s opponents want to change a rule that requires delegates to vote for the candidate to whom they were committed after state primaries and caucuses. Trump’s nomination is essentially automatic under the current rules, because he has far more than the 1,237 delegates required to win.

Some rebellious delegates threatened to walk out if they are thwarted, perhaps on Monday. Should that occur in significant numbers, it could leave television cameras panning across empty seats.

“We won’t sit around and coronate a king,” said Colorado delegate Kendal Unruh, who like many insurgents has backed vanquished presidential contender Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.

Trump’s campaign dismissed the effort.

“What will happen on the floor, if there’s any attempt, is the party and Trump are going to rise against it,” Manafort said.


Related stories:

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The roll call vote on the nomination was expected Tuesday, with Trump scheduled to close the convention with an acceptance speech late Thursday.

Trump would gain the nomination at a time of crisis and tumult at home and abroad, punctuated Sunday by the deadly shooting of three police officers in Baton Rouge, La.

Earlier this month, the slaying of a black man in Baton Rouge by white officers led to protests nationwide and heightened concerns about the state of race relations in America. President Barack Obama, responding to the shooting Sunday, noted that the incidents had come just before political conventions that tend to involve “overheated” rhetoric. Obama urged both parties to avoid “careless accusations” intended to score political points.

“Everyone right now, focus on words and actions that can unite this country, rather than divide us further,” Obama said.

But Trump, insinuating that Obama held some responsibility, earlier blamed a “lack of leadership” for the Baton Rouge shootings and added on Twitter, “We demand law and order.”

Democrat Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, echoed Obama’s words in a statement urging Americans not to “turn our backs on each other.”

Even before the latest violence, Trump’s choice of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate had been overshadowed by a deadly truck attack in France and an attempted coup in Turkey.

Cleveland hoped it would escape any violence of its own.

Protests are widely expected outside the Quicken Loans Arena, where the city’s police chief, Calvin Williams, said Sunday it seemed everyone was arriving to “exercise their First Amendment rights.”

The circumstances only add to the attention placed on Trump and his politically incorrect and unscripted campaign, which has successfully tapped into a wave of populist anger across America.

Trump has thrilled supporters with a willingness to hurl insults at Democrats and Republicans alike: “Little Marco” (Rubio) and “Crooked Hillary” among them. Yet his off-the-cuff rhetoric and disorganized campaign have turned off many Republican leaders.

His blunt tone and aggressive approach to immigration and terrorism have done the same with key segments of general election voters: women, blacks and Hispanics, especially.

According to any number of preference polls, Trump heads into the convention as one of the most unpopular major party nominees ever.

All that makes the convention must-see TV.

“He doesn’t have natural filters,” said New York GOP Chairman Ed Cox. “Let’s see about the acceptance speech. … People don’t know exactly what it’s going to be.”

Associated Press writers Bill Barrow in Atlanta and Josh Lederman in Cleveland contributed to this report.

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