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The company logo and view of Netflix headquarters in Los Gatos, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Netflix to invest $500M in Canadian programs as part of feds’ new cultural plan

CityNews | posted Thursday, Sep 28th, 2017

An agreement that Netflix will invest at least $500 million in original productions in Canada is set to be part of a long-awaited reboot of Canada’s cultural policy.

Heritage Minister Melanie Joly will unveil the comprehensive overhaul Thursday that will look at everything from the CRTC to how best to sell and promote Canada’s creative work.

The plan is being dubbed a “creative economic strategy” designed to both update the approach the government takes to encouraging Canadian content production and the laws and organizations which govern it.

Getting companies like Netflix to play a bigger role financially is one of the government’s goals as traditional broadcasters have long complained about an uneven playing field.

Some had hoped to see the policy force the U.S. giants to charge sales tax for their subscriptions or contribute to the same content funds as Canadian broadcasters.

But a government source, not authorized to speak on the record, says Netflix has agreed to invest at least $500 million over the next five years in original productions here.

The government is eager to see Facebook and Google do the same; the search engine giant did recently launch a dedicated Canadian content channel on YouTube.

The goal is to make sure the government’s approach to Canadian content is not tied to arcane technology of the past, and is flexible enough to bolster content creators, be they musicians, artists, writers, architects or video game designers, while also helping them sell their wares abroad.

The policy is the product of months of consultations and will plot a course for a review of the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act, which was promised in the 2017 federal budget.

Joly’s speech — scheduled to begin at noon ET Thursday at the Fairmont Chateau Laurier in downtown Ottawa, in the shadow of Parliament Hill — will cover three themes: investing in creators, helping their content get discovered and distributed and — a staple of any conversation on Canadian culture — a discussion on the future of public broadcasting.

There are some other announcements likely, including more robust funding to help Canadian film, television and music producers find an audience. Some money was allocated to two programs in the 2016 budget, but the expectation is that they’ll be supported with additional funds.

“As our economy changes in an information age, we need to support creative talent who will be critical in future economic growth,” said David Sparrow, president of ACTRA, the performers’ union.

CBC president Hubert Lacroix said ensuring that all of the players chip in to develop Canada’s cultural content will be essential to the survival of Canada’s relatively small marketplace.

“The levelling of the playing field, so that everyone … contributes to the ecosystem, is key,” Lacroix said. “We’re too small in this world to be doing this by ourselves.”

Ontario to require disclosure of pharma payments to health professionals

CityNews | posted Thursday, Sep 28th, 2017

Bottles of prescription drugs as labeled Lipitor, TriCor, Plavix, Singulair, Lexapro and Avapro are displayed (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Wide-ranging legislation introduced Wednesday by the Ontario government will require public disclosure of payments that pharmaceutical companies make to doctors, increase inspections for splash pads, barber shops and nail shops, and license medical device operators who use X-ray machines, CT scanners, and MRIs.

The bill was introduced Wednesday afternoon by Health Minister Eric Hoskins, who said it will make province’s health care system “more efficient and more transparent” for patients. If passed, the bill will modernize 10 pieces of legislation, the government said.

The bill would change existing rules for paramedics, who by law can only transport patients to hospital following a 911 call. The new rules, if passed, would allow paramedics to transport a patient to a non-hospital setting, like a mental health facility.

The legislation would change the safety inspection program for the province’s long-term care homes with new enforcement tolls that would include higher fines.

Public health regulations around recreational water facilities like splash pads and wading pools and rules for personal service settings like barber shops and nail salons, will be clarified under the regulations and make enforcement easier, the government said.

The bill would also tighten up rules and enhance enforcement around community health facilities which operate medical radiation devices like X-rays, CT scanners and ultrasound machines. Ultrasound operators would also be more strictly regulated.

The most high profile piece of the act introduces mandatory reporting from pharmaceautical companies and medical device manufacturers make to health care professionals.

“It gives them tools and information that they can then use to make more informed decisions about their own health care, so I believe it’s something Ontarians want and deserve,” Hoskins said in an interview Tuesday.

“We are the first jurisdiction in Canada to undertake this, so I think that that leadership by Ontario is important on an issue that I think resonates with all Canadians.”

The province consulted over the summer with patient groups, health-care providers and the pharmaceutical and medical device industries about payments such as speaking engagement fees, paid meals, and travel expenses.

The legislation would require disclosure of the payments and create an online, searchable database of that information.

Ten major pharmaceutical companies released data earlier this year showing they had paid nearly $50 million to Canadian health-care professionals and organizations last year.

Drug company GlaxoSmithKline – one of those 10 companies – is supportive of the legislation.

Ethics and compliance officer Annie Bourgault said the company may, for example, pay a doctor to participate in a consultation meeting to speak about patient needs when GSK is about to launch a new medication.

“At the end of the day it’s for the benefit of the patients, so there’s kind of no downside to being transparent,” she said.

Payments from pharmaceutical companies to health-care providers can raise concerns about conflicts of interest in the prescribing and promotion of certain drugs.

But Hoskins said introducing legislation shouldn’t imply that the government believes there are negative connotations to such payments.

“What we want to do is … present information so that patients and health providers and the industry can have a better understanding of the nature of the transactions that are taking place.”

There are already some restrictions in Ontario on the types of benefits that can be received, but disclosure isn’t always required.

A policy from the regulatory body for doctors in the province says physicians must not accept compensation from the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industries in exchange for meeting with promotional representatives, and they must not accept personal gifts.

They can, however, accept items such as teaching aids that benefit patients, under the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario’s policy. They can also accept drug samples.

Doctors are allowed to accept compensation at “fair market value” for presenting at industry-supported continuing education events, sitting on advisory or consultation boards, and for participating in industry research.

The Ontario Medical Association has said it hoped any changes to disclosure rules would be applied to all health-care professionals to ensure doctors are on a level playing field. Hoskins said Tuesday it would apply to all regulated health professions in the province.

But many of the details, such as the minimum payment that would trigger the disclosure requirement, will be left out of the legislation and decided through regulations.

“We had a substantial consultation over the course of the summer and there was clear and broad support for the direction that we’re taking and the support for this proposed legislation,” Hoskins said.

“We’ll have that opportunity as we go forward … to continue the dialogue and continue the consultation and learn from other jurisdictions, but also hear from stakeholders.”

Patients in the United States, Australia and some European countries can already go online to see how much money their health-care providers have received from pharmaceutical companies.

New citizenship oath to include reference to treaties with Indigenous Peoples

CityNews | posted Thursday, Sep 28th, 2017

Aboriginal drummers welcome premiers and National Aboriginal Organizational leaders to an event in Haines Junction, Yukon, on July, 20, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

A revised oath of citizenship that will require new Canadians to faithfully observe the country’s treaties with Indigenous Peoples is nearly complete.

The proposed new text was put to focus groups held by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in March, following months of consultation by departmental officials.

It reads: “I swear (or affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, her heirs and successors, and that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada including treaties with Indigenous Peoples, and fulfil my duties as a Canadian citizen.”

The language comes from the 94th and final recommendation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which examined the legacy of Canada’s residential schools.

Implementing that recommendation was one of the tasks given to Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen when he was sworn into his portfolio in January 2017, but work on it began soon after the commission delivered its recommendations in late 2015, briefing notes for the minister suggest.

The notes, obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act, show the government also wants to modify the script delivered by those who preside over citizenship ceremonies. The proposed notes say the script should refer to ceremonies taking place on traditional territories, and include remarks on the history of Indigenous Peoples.

When it comes to the oath, the inclusion of a reference to treaties is the only proposed change.

Changing the wording requires a legislative amendment to the Citizenship Act. The Liberals are currently in the process of overhauling the act in a bid to make citizenship easier to obtain.

When the proposed text was put to focus groups composed of both recent immigrants and longtime Canadian residents, reaction was generally positive, according to a report posted online by the Immigration department this week.

But there was a caveat: “Participants only agreed with the modifications insofar as newcomers are adequately educated about Indigenous Peoples and the treaties,” the report said.

“Many felt that they themselves would struggle with this new formulation, given their own limited knowledge of the treaties.”

Some wondered about the need for changes at all.

“A few participants took it upon themselves to question the need to modify the oath and that it might represent a precedent whereby other groups in Canada will want to be represented in the oath,” the report said.

The new oath comes along with a major overhaul of the study guide used for the citizenship exam. A draft copy obtained by The Canadian Press earlier this year revealed it, too, will include extensive references to Indigenous history and culture.

The Liberals had originally been aiming to unveil both the new guide and oath around Canada Day, but work is ongoing.

Don Cherry calls media coverage of kneeling protests hypocritical

CityNews | posted Thursday, Sep 28th, 2017

Buffalo Bills players kneel during the American National anthem before an NFL game against the Denver Broncos at New Era Field in Orchard Park, New York, on Sept. 24, 2017. GETTY IMAGES/Brett Carlsen

Hockey commentator Don Cherry believes media coverage of athletes kneeling during the playing of national anthems has been hypocritical.

The popular TV personality best known for his Coach’s Corner segment on Hockey Night in Canada posted a statement to his verified Twitter account on Wednesday night taking aim at “left wing media” and its coverage of National Football League players taking a knee during the American national anthem to protest the racist treatment of African Americans.

Cherry pointed out in his statement that former Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow, a devout Christian, was mocked by the media for taking a knee to pray after scoring a touchdown in his breakout rookie season in 2010.

“The late night leftie talk shows made fun of Tim, to the cartoonists in the paper he was a joke and they made fun of him. It was brutal,” said Cherry in the 131-word document. “Yet the NFL players go on their knees to make a point and they are heroes.”

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began the kneeling phenomenon in 2016, refusing to stand during the anthem in the NFL’s pre-season. It has since become common across the league and has spread to Major League Baseball and the Canadian Football League. National Hockey League players Wayne Simmonds and Joel Ward have both entertained the idea of kneeling during the anthems during that sport’s pre-season.

The protests have drawn the ire of U.S. President Donald Trump, who had repeatedly criticized NFLers for the practice in interviews and on Twitter. In response to Trump’s demands to stop the kneeling, more athletes have begun to protest.

On Sunday, all but one of the Pittsburgh Steelers refused to take the field during the national anthem, while other teams linked arms or groups of players sat or took a knee. In response to Trump’s tweets, the National Basketball Association’s Golden State Warriors refused to visit the White House, a tradition among reigning championship teams.

Cherry believes that Tebow was mocked while Kaepernick and others have been praised because of religious persecution.

“The reason they can make fun and ridicule Tim getting on his knees and thanking the Lord is because he is a Christian,” said Cherry. “No other religion you can make fun of and ridicule … only Christianity. If you are Christian you are open season.”

Kaepernick is also open about his Christianity, with Biblical tattoos covering his torso and his own touchdown celebrations “thanking Him.”

Oakville council rejects bid to demolish Glen Abbey for development

CityNews | posted Thursday, Sep 28th, 2017

File photo of the entrance of the Glen Abbey Golf Club on Aug. 20, 2017.

Oakville town council has voted unanimously to reject a plan to demolish the historic Glen Abbey golf course despite its heritage status.

Glen Abbey’s owner ClubLink filed an application Monday to demolish or remove the golf course and some buildings to make way for a mix of homes, offices and stores.

The golf course has hosted the Canadian Open 28 times.

In August, the Town of Oakville voted in favour of designating Glen Abbey as a heritage site, giving it some protection under Ontario heritage laws.

ClubLink had applied to demolish the golf course and several buildings, but some sites, including stables and the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame and Museum, would have remained.

The development plan proposed construction of 141 detached homes, 299 townhomes, 2,782 apartments, retail and office space, as well as parks, open space and natural heritage areas.

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner dead at 91

CityNews | posted Thursday, Sep 28th, 2017

Hugh Hefner with Bunnies at the Playboy Club in Chicago in 1960. Photo credit: Playboy

Playboy founder Hugh M. Hefner, the pipe-smoking hedonist who revved up the sexual revolution in the 1950s and built a multimedia empire of clubs, mansions, movies and television, symbolized by bow-tied women in bunny costumes, has died at age 91.

Hefner died of natural causes at his home surrounded by family on Wednesday night, Playboy said in a statement.

As much as anyone, Hefner helped slip sex out of the confines of plain brown wrappers and into mainstream conversation.

In 1953, a time when states could legally ban contraceptives, when the word “pregnant” was not allowed on “I Love Lucy,” Hefner published the first issue of Playboy, featuring naked photos of Marilyn Monroe (taken years earlier) and an editorial promise of “humour, sophistication and spice.” The Great Depression and World War II were over and America was ready to get undressed.

Playboy soon became forbidden fruit for teenagers and a bible for men with time and money, primed for the magazine’s prescribed evenings of dimmed lights, hard drinks, soft jazz, deep thoughts and deeper desires. Within a year, circulation neared 200,000. Within five years, it had topped 1 million.

By the 1970s, the magazine had more than 7 million readers and had inspired such raunchier imitations as Penthouse and Hustler. Competition and the internet reduced circulation to less than 3 million by the 21st century, and the number of issues published annually was cut from 12 to 11. In 2015, Playboy ceased publishing images of naked women, citing the proliferation of nudity on the internet.

But Hefner and Playboy remained brand names worldwide.

Asked by The New York Times in 1992 of what he was proudest, Hefner responded: “That I changed attitudes toward sex. That nice people can live together now. That I decontaminated the notion of premarital sex. That gives me great satisfaction.”

Hefner ran Playboy from his elaborate mansions, first in Chicago and then in Los Angeles, and became the flamboyant symbol of the lifestyle he espoused. For decades he was the pipe-smoking, silk-pajama-wearing centre of a constant party with celebrities and Playboy models. By his own account, Hefner had sex with more than a thousand women, including many pictured in his magazine. One of rock n’ roll’s most decadent tours, the Rolling Stones shows of 1972, featured a stop at the Hefner mansion.

Throughout the 1960s, Hefner left Chicago only a few times. In the early 1970s, he bought the second mansion in Los Angeles, flying between his homes on a private DC-9 dubbed “The Big Bunny,” which boasted a giant Playboy bunny emblazoned on the tail.

Hefner was host of a television show, “Playboy After Dark,” and in 1960 opened a string of clubs around the world where waitresses wore revealing costumes with bunny ears and fluffy white bunny tails. In the 21st century, he was back on television in a cable reality show – “The Girls Next Door” – with three live-in girlfriends in the Los Angeles Playboy mansion. Network television briefly embraced Hefner’s empire in 2011 with the NBC drama “The Playboy Club,” which failed to lure viewers and was cancelled after three episodes.

Censorship was inevitable, starting in the 1950s, when Hefner successfully sued to prevent the U.S. Postal Service from denying him second-class mailing status. Playboy has been banned in China, India, Saudi Arabia and Ireland, and 7-Eleven stores for years did not sell the magazine. Stores that did offer Playboy made sure to stock it on a higher shelf.

Women were warned from the first issue: “If you’re somebody’s sister, wife, or mother-in-law,” the magazine declared, “and picked us up by mistake, please pass us along to the man in your life and get back to Ladies Home Companion.”

Playboy proved a scourge, and a temptation. Drew Barrymore, Farrah Fawcett and Linda Evans are among those who have posed for the magazine. Several bunnies became celebrities, too, including singer Deborah Harry and model Lauren Hutton, both of whom had fond memories of their time with Playboy. Other bunnies had traumatic experiences, with several alleging they had been raped by Hefner’s close friend Bill Cosby, who faced dozens of such allegations. Hefner issued a statement in late 2014 he “would never tolerate this behaviour.” But two years later, former bunny Chloe Goins sued Cosby and Hefner for sexual battery, gender violence and other charges over an alleged 2008 rape.

One bunny turned out to be a journalist: Feminist Gloria Steinem got hired in the early 1960s and turned her brief employment into an article for Show magazine that described the clubs as pleasure havens for men only. The bunnies, Steinem wrote, tended to be poorly educated, overworked and underpaid. Steinem regarded the magazine and clubs not as erotic, but “pornographic.”

“I think Hefner himself wants to go down in history as a person of sophistication and glamour. But the last person I would want to go down in history as is Hugh Hefner,” Steinem later said.

“Women are the major beneficiaries of getting rid of the hypocritical old notions about sex,” Hefner responded. “Now some people are acting as if the sexual revolution was a male plot to get laid. One of the unintended by-products of the women’s movement is the association of the erotic impulse with wanting to hurt somebody.”

Hefner added that he was a strong advocate of First Amendment, civil rights and reproductive rights and that the magazine contained far more than centerfolds. Playboy serialized Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and later published fiction by John Updike, Doris Lessing and Vladimir Nabokov. Playboy also specialized in long and candid interviews, from Fidel Castro and Frank Sinatra to Marlon Brando and then-presidential candidate Jimmy Carter, who confided that he had “committed adultery” in his heart. John Lennon spoke to Playboy in 1980, not long before he was murdered.

The line that people read Playboy for the prose, not the pictures, was only partly a joke.

Playboy’s clubs also influenced the culture, giving early breaks to such entertainers as George Carlin, Rich Little, Mark Russell, Dick Gregory and Redd Foxx. The last of the clubs closed in 1988, when Hefner deemed them “passe” and “too tame for the times.”

By then Hefner had built a $200 million company by expanding Playboy to include international editions of the magazine, casinos, a cable network and a film production company. In 2006, he got back into the club business with his Playboy Club at the Palms Casino in Las Vegas. A new enterprise in London followed, along with fresh response from women’s groups, who protested the opening with cries of “Eff off Hef!”‘

Hefner liked to say he was untroubled by criticism, but in 1985 he suffered a mild stroke that he blamed on the book “The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten 1960-1980,” by filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich. Stratten was a Playmate killed by her husband, Paul Snider, who then killed himself. Bogdanovich, Stratton’s boyfriend at the time, wrote that Hefner helped bring about her murder and was unable to deal with “what he and his magazine do to women.”

After the stroke, Hefner handed control of his empire to his feminist daughter, Christie, although he owned 70 per cent of Playboy stock and continued to choose every month’s Playmate and cover shot. Christie Hefner continued as CEO until 2009.

He also stopped using recreational drugs and tried less to always be the life of the party. He tearfully noted in a 1992 New York Times interview: “I’ve spent so much of my life looking for love in all the wrong places.”

Not surprisingly, Hefner’s marriage life was also a bit of a show. In 1949, he married Mildred Williams, with whom he had two children. They divorced in 1958. In July 1989, Hefner married Kimberley Conrad, the 1989 Playmate of the Year, who was then 27. The couple also had two children.

On the eve of his marriage, Hefner was asked if he would have a bachelor party. “I’ve had a bachelor party for 30 years,” he said. “Why do I need one now?”

They separated in 1998 but she continued living next door to the Playboy mansion with their two sons. The couple divorced in 2010 and he proposed in 2011 to 24-year-old Crystal Harris, a former Playmate. Harris called off the wedding days before the ceremony, but changed her mind and they married at the end of 2012.

“Maybe I should be single,” he said a few months later. “But I do know that I need an ongoing romantic relationship. In other words, I am essentially a very romantic person, and all I really was looking for, quite frankly, with the notion of marriage was continuity and something to let the girl know that I really cared.”

He acknowledged, at age 85, that “I never really found my soulmate.”

Hefner was born in Chicago on April 9, 1926, to devout Methodist parents who he said never showed “love in a physical or emotional way.”

“At a very early age, I began questioning a lot of that religious foolishness about man’s spirit and body being in conflict, with God primarily with the spirit of man and the Devil dwelling in the flesh,” Hefner said in a Playboy interview in 1974.

“Part of the reason that I am who I am is my Puritan roots run deep,” he told the AP in 2011. “My folks are Puritan. My folks are prohibitionists. There was no drinking in my home. No discussion of sex. And I think I saw the hurtful and hypocritical side of that from very early on. ”

Hefner loved movies throughout his life, calling them “my other family.” He screened classic films and new releases at the mansion every week. Every year on his April 9 birthday, he’d run his favourite film, “Casablanca,” and invite guests to dress in the fashions of the 1940s.

He was a playboy before Playboy, even during his first marriage, when he enjoyed stag films, strip poker and group sex. His bunny obsession began with the figures that decorated a childhood blanket. Years later, a real-life subspecies of rabbit on the endangered species list, in the Florida Keys, would be named for him: Sylvilagus palustris hefneri.

When Hefner was 9, he began publishing a neighbourhood newspaper, which he sold for a penny a copy. He spent much of his time writing and drawing cartoons, and in middle school began reading Esquire, a magazine of sex and substance Hefner wanted Playboy to emulate.

He and Playboy co-founder Eldon Sellers launched their magazine from Hefner’s kitchen in Chicago, although the first issue was undated because Hefner doubted there would be a second. The magazine was supposed to be called Stag Party, until an outdoor magazine named Stag threatened legal action.

Hefner recalled that he first reinvented himself in high school in Chicago at 16, when he was rejected by a girl he had a crush on. He began referring to himself as Hef instead of Hugh, learned the jitterbug and began drawing a comic book, “a kind of autobiography that put myself centre stage in a life I created for myself,” he said in a 2006 interview with the AP.

Those comics evolved into a detailed scrapbook that Hefner would keep throughout his life. It spanned more than 2,500 volumes in 2011 – a Guinness World Record for a personal scrapbook collection.

“It was probably just a way of creating a world of my own to share with my friends,” Hefner said, seated amid the archives of his life during a 2011 interview. “And in retrospect, in thinking about it, it’s not a whole lot different than creating the magazine.”

He did it again in 1960, when he began hosting the TV show, bought a fancy car, started smoking a pipe and bought the first Playboy mansion.

“Well, if we hadn’t had the Wright brothers, there would still be airplanes,” Hefner said in 1974. “If there hadn’t been an Edison, there would still be electric lights. And if there hadn’t been a Hefner, we’d still have sex. But maybe we wouldn’t be enjoying it as much. So the world would be a little poorer. Come to think of it, so would some of my relatives.”

Glen Abbey owner wants to demolish parts of golf course despite heritage status

CityNews | posted Wednesday, Sep 27th, 2017

File photo of the entrance of the Glen Abbey Golf Club on Aug. 20, 2017.

The Oakville town council will continue Wednesday to hear submissions on a plan to demolish the historic Glen Abbey golf course despite its heritage status.

Glen Abbey’s owner ClubLink filed an application Monday to demolish or remove the golf course and some buildings to make way for a mix of homes, offices and stores.

ClubLink is battling local residents over its redevelopment plan for the golf course, which has hosted the Canadian Open 28 times.

In August, the Town of Oakville voted in favour of designating Glen Abbey as a heritage site, giving it some protection under Ontario heritage laws.

ClubLink has accused the Town of overreaching but says it will not appeal the heritage designation.

Council heard Tuesday night from a number of groups opposed to ClubLink’s plans and will take up the issue again on Wednesday night.

The company has applied to demolish the golf course and several buildings, but some sites, including stables and the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame and Museum, will remain.

‘Some progress’ made as contract talks resume between GM and striking workers

CityNews | posted Wednesday, Sep 27th, 2017

General Motors Co. (GM) signage is displayed outside of General Motor of Canada Ltd. headquarter offices in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, on Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. General Motors of Canada Ltd. will pump $2.535-billion into a trust fund that will finance health-care costs for its retirees, eliminating a key legacy cost that the auto maker said hobbled it in the fiercely competitive North American auto market, according to The Globe and Mail. Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The union representing 2,500 workers who have been on strike since Sept. 17 at GM Canada’s CAMI assembly plant in Ingersoll, Ont., says contracts talks have resumed with the automaker.

Unifor Local 88 says the two sides met on Tuesday in Woodstock, Ont., where GM responded to proposals put forward last Sunday.

A statement on the local’s website says “some progress has been made” and the talks will continue.

The brief statement did not elaborate, nor has Unifor revealed what was contained in Sunday’s formal proposal.

However, the union had previously said it wants the automaker to designate the CAMI plant as the lead producer of the Equinox sport utility vehicle _ currently the only product built at the plant.

Job security has become more of an issue for the union since GM shifted production of its Terrain SUV from the CAMI plant to Mexico earlier this year at a loss of more than 400 jobs.

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