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1 officer shot in Las Vegas, 4 shot in St. Louis amid Floyd protests

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jun 2nd, 2020

LAS VEGAS — An officer has been shot in Las Vegas and authorities are responding to another shooting as people protest the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, authorities said.

The officer was shot in the area of the Las Vegas Strip and an officer was involved in a shooting in the downtown area, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department reported early Tuesday.

The department said both shootings were on Las Vegas Boulevard.

Protesters have been rallying for days across the country over the death of George Floyd, who was seen on video pleading that he couldn’t breathe with a white police officer pressing his knee into his neck for several minutes before he stopped moving.

Meanwhile, police say four officers were hit by gunfire after protests in St. Louis that started peacefully Monday became violent overnight, with demonstrators smashing windows and stealing items from businesses and fires burning in the downtown area.

The police department tweeted early Tuesday that the officers were taken to a hospital with injuries that were not believed to be life-threatening. It was unclear who had fired the shots.

The chaos in St. Louis followed continued protests Monday in Missouri over the death of George Floyd and police treatment of African Americans, with gatherings also held in Kansas City and Jefferson City.

On Monday afternoon, several hundred people rallied peacefully outside the justice centre in downtown St. Louis, including Mayor Lyda Krewson and St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards. Protestors later walked to the Gateway Arch National Park and then onto nearby Interstate 64.

But later Monday, protesters gathered in front of police headquarters, where officers fired tear gas. Some protesters smashed windows at a downtown 7-11 store and stole items from inside before the building was set on fire.

Trump threatens military force against protesters nationwide

THE ASSOCIATE PRESS | posted Tuesday, Jun 2nd, 2020

Wielding extraordinary federal authority, President Donald Trump threatened the nation’s governors on Monday that he would deploy the military to states if they did not stamp out violent protests over police brutality that have roiled the nation over the past week.

As Trump spoke, an incredible TV split screen developed around the White House.

While he addressed the nation in the White House’s idyllic Rose Garden, a series of military vehicles rolled out front on Pennsylvania Avenue and military police and law enforcement clashed with protesters at Lafayette Park.

Trump’s bellicose rhetoric and the aggressive, orchestrated actions came as the nation braced for another round of violence at a time when the country is already buckling because of the coronavirus outbreak and the Depression-level unemployment it has caused.

The president demanded an end to the heated protests in his remarks and vowed to use more force to achieve that aim.

If governors throughout the country do not deploy the National Guard in sufficient numbers to “dominate the streets,” Trump said the U.S. military would step in to “quickly solve the problem for them.”

“We have the greatest country in the world,” the president declared. “We’re going to keep it safe.”

Minutes before Trump began speaking, police and National Guard soldiers began aggressively forcing back hundreds of peaceful protesters who had gathered in Lafayette Park, across the street from the White House, where they were chanting against police brutality and the Minneapolis death of George Floyd.

As Trump spoke, tear gas canisters could be heard exploding.

Floyd died last week after he was pinned to the pavement by a police officer who put his knee on the handcuffed Black man’s neck until he stopped breathing.

His death set off protests that spread from Minneapolis across America. His brother Terrence pleaded with protesters on Monday to remain peaceful.

The demonstrators in Lafayette Park were cleared so that after his brief statement, Trump could walk across the park to St. John’s Episcopal Church, known as “The Church of the Presidents,” which suffered fire damage in one of the protests.

Holding a Bible, he then stood with several of his Cabinet members as the cameras clicked.

The moment was quickly decried by Trump’s critics, with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo saying the president “used the military to push out a peaceful protest so he could have a photo op at a church.”

“It’s all just a reality TV show for this president,” he said on Twitter. “Shameful.”

The country has been beset by angry demonstrations for the past week in some of the most widespread racial unrest in the U.S. since the 1960s.

Spurred largely by Floyd’s death, protesters have taken to the streets to decry the killings of black people by police.

Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin has been charged with murder, but protesters are demanding that three of his colleagues be prosecuted, too. All four were fired.

While most of the demonstrations have been peaceful, others have descended into violence, leaving neighbourhoods in shambles, stores ransacked, windows broken and cars burned, despite curfews around the country and the deployment of thousands of National Guard members in at least 15 states.

On Monday, police fired tear gas at hundreds of protesters who spilled onto an interstate highway in the heart of Philadelphia just before a 6 p.m. curfew took effect.

Earlier Monday, Trump told the nation’s governors in a video conference that they “look like fools” for not deploying even more National Guard troops. “Most of you are weak,” he said.

He added: “You’ve got to arrest people, you have to track people, you have to put them in jail for 10 years and you’ll never see this stuff again.”

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, dismissed Trump’s comments as the “rantings of an insecure man trying to look strong after building his entire political career on racism.”

Former Vice-President Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential candidate, vowed to address institutional racism in his first 100 days in office. He met in person with black leaders in Delaware and also held a virtual meeting with big-city mayors.

Biden said hate emerges “when you have somebody in power who breathes oxygen into the hate.”

In Oregon, Gov. Kate Brown said she won’t send in National Guard troops to help quell violent protests in Portland because they aren’t needed and “having soldiers on the streets of America is exactly what President Trump wants.”

At a news conference earlier Monday, Brown said she would send in 100 state police from across Oregon to assist the city, and activate 50 Guard soldiers to work behind the scenes.

“You don’t defuse violence by putting soldiers on the streets,” the Democrat said.

In Minneapolis, meanwhile, Floyd’s brother Terrence made an emotional plea for peace at the site where Floyd was arrested.

“Let’s switch it up, y’all. Let’s switch it up. Do this peacefully, please,” Terrence Floyd said as he urged people to stop the violence and use their power at the ballot box.

Also Monday, an autopsy commissioned for Floyd’s family found that he died of asphyxiation from neck and back compression, the family’s attorneys said.

That distinguishes it from the official autopsy, which said he died from the effects of being restrained along with underlying health problems and potential intoxicants in his system.

The official autopsy found nothing “to support a diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia or strangulation.”

The second autopsy was done by a doctor who also examined the body of Eric Garner, a New York man who died in an officer’s choke-hold six years ago.

The family has accepted an offer from former boxing champion Floyd Mayweather to pay for Floyd’s funeral and memorial services, according to the CEO of Mayweather Promotions.

Authorities in many cities have blamed the violence on outside agitators, though have provided little evidence to back that up.

But on Monday, federal authorities arrested a 28-year-old Illinois man, Matthew Lee Rupert, saying he had posted self-recorded video on his Facebook page last week that showed him in Minneapolis handing out explosive devices and encouraging people to throw them at law enforcement officers.

The video also showed him attempting to light a business on fire, and looting, according to an FBI affidavit. Early Sunday, he posted more videos of himself in and around Chicago, saying “let’s start a riot.”

He was arrested in Chicago for violating the city’s curfew.

More than 5,600 people nationwide have been arrested over the past week for such offences as stealing, blocking highways and breaking curfew, according to a count by The Associated Press.

Police officers and National Guard soldiers enforcing a curfew in Louisville, Kentucky, killed a man early Monday when they returned fire after someone in a large group shot at them, police said.

In Indianapolis, two people were reported dead in bursts of downtown violence over the weekend, adding to deaths recorded in Detroit and Minneapolis.

While police in places tried to ease tensions by kneeling or marching in solidarity with the demonstrators, officers around the country were accused of treating protesters with the same kind of heavy-handed tactics that contributed to the unrest in the first place.

Cities struggled to keep police in line.

In Fort Lauderdale, Florida, an officer was suspended for pushing a kneeling woman to the ground during a protest.

In Atlanta, two officers were fired after bashing in the window of a car and using a stun gun on the occupants.

In Los Angeles, a police SUV accelerated into several protesters, knocking two people to the ground.

In New York, the police commissioner said about six incidents were being investigated by the department’s internal affairs bureau, including a weekend confrontation in Brooklyn in which two police vehicles appeared to plow through a group of protesters.

In another incident, an officer pointed a gun at protesters, drawing condemnation from the mayor.

What Exactly Is Minor Gain Physics? PartI

rogerstestuser | posted Tuesday, Jun 2nd, 2020

Learning about basic particles can be a rather important part of high school physics for every student who’s curious concerning the discipline. The initial thing which a student have to do is learn what is gain Physics. Gram is a particle’s bulk, at which it is placed within the nuclear construction and also which can differ based upon its own mass.

Certainly one of the first items a student should bear in mind is the bulk of the particle doesn’t affect its ability. Matters that we would use this word for are particles which have bulk, including their own electrons and atoms. However, even a particle comes with a mass and in more than few instances a zero mass. The mass of the particle in question is also described as the”kinetic energy” of the particle.

To comprehend the concept of kinetic energy, then think about this atmosphere you are breathing out as you’re strolling, talking, or running. Kinetic energy is that the energy you are experiencing while going at an interest speed that is greater than the rate of sound.

It follows that you are able to transport a very large quantity of vitality. Provided that the bulk of the contaminants that are being moved is still large enough, they are able to have too much electricity since they want inmotion.

It is very important to be aware that most particles, although the ones that do not possess plenty of mass, will have a fantastic summary generator in your own words deal of power. The amount of power is based on the way it’s moving relative to the particles around it and also the particles’ speed.

We discover how energy has been moved from the particle to the nearby contaminants, it’s necessary to see the laws. They still may not be compared to one another, Considering all particles possess their mass. All of them have different speeds plus so they go in various instructions.

Because with thisthe rate of this particle can affect the course of this particle because it’s momentum. https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:189496/the13457.pdf Now that you know what is gram in Physics, you’re ready to find out more concerning this concept. You are going to discover that it is quite interesting, In the event you take a look at the newspaper which you will find with your textbook.

Within this paper, the equations for kinetic-energy were clarified. The equation that has been given for kinetic-energy was = mc2. Since it really is one of the simplest to 19, this is the absolute most frequently utilized equation in physics now.

To find out more by what is g in Physics, you are going to discover next formula, also /can-i-automatically-summarize-a-document/ known as the Work-Energy Equation. This equation examines the dynamics of movement of an object. It takes the legislation of vitality and mass to help explain the effects of a particle’s mass and kinetic energy.

The equation, called the Conservation of Energy, was the one who has been the topic of the previous chapter. This equation takes in to account the work that is done on an object, including the work done by the friction that occurs between two objects all. This can be just a exact important equation to understand when you consider exactly how several matters have been created, a person, and the ground as a complete.

The equation will tell you. This drive is defined as the very same thing because the moment force and both are utilized to spell out a thing may gain or lose momentum.

About what exactly is very little benefit Physics, now you realize, take the opportunity and energy to think about the outcome of each one of these equations. In the event you want to find out more start searching specimens for kinetic energy and conservation of electricity on the Internet. Additionally, there are sites that is going to teach you.

Ontario makes temporary change to layoff regulations to help businesses

SHAWN JEFFORDS, THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

Ontario is temporarily amending its labour laws to help businesses avoid permanently laying off workers and paying out severance, which could send some into bankruptcy during the pandemic.

The government is expected to announce today that it will amend the Employment Standards Act, which requires businesses to terminate employees who have been laid off for 13 weeks. The law then requires the business to pay severance to workers.

The change will see non-unionized workers who have had their hours reduced or eliminated placed on a temporary leave that preserves their job. Workers will still be eligible for federal emergency income support programs.

The amendment to the law will expire six weeks after the province’s declared state of emergency ends.

“We’ve heard loud and clear from employers that they don’t want to be forced to terminate their employees,” Labour Minister Monte McNaughton said in a statement. “We have to step in to make sure workers have jobs to return to.”

Last month, Ontario’s fiscal watchdog said 2.2 million people in the province have been affected by the shutdown: an estimated 1.1 million workers in the province have lost their jobs, and another 1.1 million have seen their hours sharply reduced.

According to Statistics Canada, Ontario lost 689,200 jobs in April, bringing its employment down to the lowest level since 2009. The province’s unemployment rate climbed to 11.3 per cent, the highest it has been since 1993.

Small and medium-sized businesses, and groups that advocate on their behalf, had been asking for the temporary change to the province’s labour laws.

The Ontario Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Federation of Independent Business and Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters have all called for the measure.

They feared that once the terminations were triggered, the severance costs would put many businesses who were struggling to stay afloat during the pandemic, into bankruptcy.

The amendment will apply retroactively to March 1 and does not include unionized workers who are covered by collective agreements.

In March, Premier Doug Ford said people should not and will not have to worry about the security of their job if they have to quarantine or self-isolate, or if they have to stay home to look after kids or others because of COVID-19.

“The reality is we’re facing some rough waters ahead but we will get through this together,” Ford said at the time.

The province also announced legislation to ban employers from requiring sick notes for those in self-isolation or quarantine. It will also ensure protected leave for workers who have to take unpaid leave to isolate themselves or care for others, such as children not in school.

The government has said those measures will be retroactive to Jan. 25.

How to be an ally in everyday situations

THE BIG STORY | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

In today’s Big Story podcast, the images of police killing black men or assaulting protesters are horrifying and disgusting, but they are just the most visible tip of an ugly, ugly iceberg. Before we talk about how far we’ll really have to go to change a culture of police brutality, we’re going to talk about what each of us, especially those with privilege, should be ready to do right now.

Many of us won’t be in harm’s way on the front lines of a protest—but we also miss the many chances we have to be an ally when it can make a difference. Today, we revisit a conversation about what keeps us quiet or still when racists, sexist and homophobic acts occur in front of us, and how we can change that. Until tomorrow, stay safe and help each other out.

You can subscribe to The Big Story podcast on Apple PodcastsGoogle and Spotify

You can also find it at thebigstorypodcast.ca.

More provinces moving to further loosen COVID-19 restrictions

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

OTTAWA — As COVID-19 cases continue to decline in much of the country, some provinces are moving today to loosen more of the restrictions they implemented to slow the spread of the pandemic.

British Columbia is giving parents the option of sending their children back to school on a part-time basis.

For kindergarten to Grade 5, most students will go to school half time, while grades 6 to 12 will attend classes about one day a week. The government has said its goal is for the return of full-time classes in September.

Manitoba is easing a raft of restrictions, including its ban on people visiting loved ones in personal care homes, though safeguards such as screening visitors and maintaining physical distancing will apply.

Community centres, seniors clubs, fitness clubs, dine-in restaurants, bars, bowling alleys, pools, amateur sports and recreation programs can also reopen with limits on customer capacity and rules for physical distancing.

Film productions are being allowed to resume and a ban on non-essential travel to the province’s north is being eased.

In Ontario Drive-in movie theatres and batting cages were allowed to reopen Sunday, and today campers can return to provincial parks, with certain stipulations.

Meanwhile, Prince Edward Island is moving into the third phase of its reopening plan, which allows in-house dining at restaurants as well as the reopening of child-care centres and libraries. Also allowed now are outdoor visits with residents at long-term care homes, certain recreational and sporting activities and gatherings of up to 15 people indoors and 20 outdoors.

In Ottawa this morning, Prime Minister Trudeau will resume his daily briefings on the pandemic after taking the weekend off.

On Sunday Canada’s total number of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases stood at 90,929 — 739 more than the day before — with the vast majority of cases in Quebec and Ontario. Some 48,854 cases were listed as being resolved, while the number of deaths from the illness rose by 222 to 7,295.

Montreal protest against anti-black racism, police impunity turns violent

THE CANADIAN PRESS | posted Monday, Jun 1st, 2020

A Montreal anti-racism protest demanding justice for a black Minnesota man who died following a police intervention last week degenerated into clashes between police and some demonstrators on Sunday night.

About three hours after a march that snaked its way through downtown Montreal on Sunday afternoon had ended, Montreal police declared the gathering illegal after they say projectiles were thrown at officers who responded with pepper spray and tear gas.

Tensions flared after the formal rally had concluded and some demonstrators made their way back to the starting point, in the shadow of Montreal police headquarters downtown.

Windows were smashed, fires were set and the situation slid into a game of cat-and-mouse between pockets of protesters and police trying to disperse them.

Demonstrators had gathered to denounce racist violence and police impunity – both in the U.S. and at home in Montreal.

George Floyd died in Minneapolis on Monday after pleading for air while a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck.

His death has sparked nightly protests in major U.S. cities.

The Montreal rally was a solidarity gathering with American anti-racism activists, but organizers say it is also an opportunity to express their own anger at the treatment of racialized people in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada.

Some of the names invoked included names of black men killed during Montreal police interventions in recent years.

“It’s important for everyone to be here today so that we can have a lot of voices to say the George Floyd event is not a singular event,” said Marie-Livia Beauge, one of the event organizers. “It keeps happening and it’s happening here in Montreal so to be here together is to show solidarity and denounce the injustice.”

The gathering drew Montrealers of all stripes and backgrounds, holding posters with slogans. Protesters chanted “Black lives matter” and “I can’t breathe” – what Floyd was caught on video saying.

They took a knee in unison several times in solidarity with the movement.

But when Montreal police called on protesters to disperse, some refused.

Leah Blain, 20, chose to continue demonstrating and was part of a group trying to reach police headquarters when she was met with pepper spray.

“We were just standing here, we were showing our support and this is what happens, the police support a system that’s against us, so if you support them, you’re against us,” she said.

Vincent Mousseau, a social worker and community organizer, called out Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante, who earlier Sunday had condemned “violence, racism and systemic discrimination” in a series of tweets.

Mousseau cautioned against empty words from leaders.

“In fighting this, we need to ensure our movements are not co-opted to stifle our anger with their kind word and simultaneous inaction,” Mousseau said.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizers repeatedly told people to spread out, trying to find a spot where a two-metre distance could be maintained.

Despite a majority of people wearing masks and organizers squirting hand sanitizer, the numbers attending made distancing impossible.

The location adjacent to Montreal police headquarters was packed, with police closely guarding the building that houses their brass.

Dr. Horacio Arruda, Quebec’s director of public health, told Radio-Canada on Sunday evening that he recognized the importance of the cause but urged hand washing and for anyone exhibiting symptoms to let health authorities know they attended the protest.

Around the start of the demonstration, Montreal police took the unusual step of issuing a tweet saying they were dismayed by the death of George Floyd.

“Both the action taken and the inaction of the witnesses present go against the values of our organization,” the force tweeted calling on for a peaceful demonstration.

“We respect the rights and the need of everyone to speak out against this violence and will be by your side to ensure your safety,” the police said.

The Montreal rally followed one in Toronto on Saturday, which remained peaceful.

So too did Sunday’s rally in Vancouver, where thousands gathered outside the city’s art gallery, waving signs and chanting their support of the Black Lives Matter movement and Floyd.

Tristan Miura, who held up a skateboard painted with the words “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” said he hopes Vancouver will reflect on the protesters’ message.

“Vancouver has always been quite liberal and very open about what they feel is wrong in the community,” said Miura. “I think Vancouver, as a whole, is taking this time to reflect on past issues and preventing further issues from occurring.”

Others hoped it would spark a larger reaction in Canada.

“I hope this is just the start,” said Chance Lovett. “I hope this is just the beginning of a larger conversation and a larger movement.”

Vancouver police said there have been no arrests during the event.

Pearson airport restricted to only travellers starting June 1

BT Toronto | posted Friday, May 29th, 2020

Pearson International Airport officials are limiting the number of people who will be allowed to enter the terminal starting next week.

According to a directive sent by the Greater Toronto Airport Authority, “meeters and greeters” will not be allowed to accompany passengers arriving and/or leaving in to the airport. An exception will be made for anyone who is travelling as an unaccompanied minor or assisting anyone with disabilities.

The restriction also applies to those individuals who work at Pearson.

“Airport workers who need to meet with family members or other acquaintances for any reason before, during or after their workday, must do so outside the terminal buildings,” reads the directive. “Family members or acquaintances are not permitted inside the terminals for any reason until further notice from the GTAA.”

All airport workers are asked to maintain a two metre distance between colleagues and passengers wherever possible in the terminal.

Also as of June 1, all passengers and airport workers will be required to wear a face covering at all times when in public areas of the airport including security screening, parking facilities, sidewalks and curbs outside the terminal and other outdoor public areas.

The directive says you may be asked to remove the face covering for identification purposes or if you are seated and physically distanced when eating or drinking.

Since April 20, people flying to or from Canadian airports have been required to wear face covering following a Transport Canada directive.

When it comes to enforcing the new measures, the GTAA says Peel Regional Police, security guards and the airport’s public safety officers will be “politely educating” staff and passengers who are not following the new requirements.

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